Red Thread Reblog: Chinese Dragons — Olivia’s Blog

Red Thread
Artwork by Bridget Sarsen.

Welcome to Red Thread Reblog, a feature that pairs a post about media inspired by mythology with a post about the mythology shown in the media.

The dragons in Eon and Eona are based on Chinese mythology, so an overview of that makes it easier to grasp their world. Olivia’s Blog, maintained by Olivia or olichi19, provides just that in this wonderful post on Chinese dragons. It’s one of the more comprehensive descriptions of Chinese dragons I have found in the current blogosphere. It includes the different types, the symbolism of dragons, and even the dragon as an animal sign in Chinese astrology. Goodman’s dragons are each associated with one of the 12 animal signs from this system, whereas Olivia explains how each dragon year is further associated with one of the five elements.  Whether you’re interested in some context for the books or you just want some cool facts about Chinese dragons, this is the place to start!

The Chinese dragon like the Indian Naga’s, are often associated with water and rain and lakes and rivers. Chinese Dragons are divine mythical creatures that brings with it ultimate abundance, prosperity and good fortune. The Chinese proclaim themselves “Lung Tik Chuan Ren”, Descendents of the Dragon. Unlike the the negative aspect associated with Western Dragons, […]

via Chinese Dragons — Olivia’s Blog

Red Thread Reblog: Eona: Review — Average Nicole

Welcome to Red Thread Reblog, a feature that pairs a post about media inspired by mythology with a post about the mythology shown in the media.

As promised, here are the dragons! Alison Goodman’s YA duology of Eon: The Last Dragoneye and Eona came out nearly ten years ago, but these books remain among the few I’ve discovered to explore certain details of Chinese dragon mythology for more adult readers. This fantasy world is not based entirely on Chinese culture and creates its own distinct landscape where dragon power is harnessed as a sort of weather control. For more details, I suggest this review by Average Nicole at Inner Confusions. If you haven’t visited Inner Confusions before, I recommend checking it out. Nicole posts both book reviews and personal writing, often piercing reflections on life with the occasional poem. Her review focuses mainly on Eona but also includes a quick summery of Eon. Like many of her reviews, it features a non-spoiler section and a spoiler section. So choose your style and visit her review!

4.0/5.0 Stars Author: Alison Goodman Pages: 637 Published: 2011 After not reading for MONTHS, I decided to finally start again with Eona by Alison Goodman. And I am glad to say I was not disappointed. Eona is the sequel to Eon, and the conclusion in the duology. I read Eon back in I think 2015, […]

via Eona: Review — Average Nicole

 

Red Thread Reblog: Chinese Goblins, Monsters, Spirits, Demons, Ghosts, Immortals, and Gods — Haoheng Chinese Translations

Welcome to Red Thread Reblog, a feature that pairs a post about media inspired by mythology with a post about the mythology shown in the media.

Happy Lunar New Year! Now that we’ve taken a look at The Dragon Warrior, let’s look at the mythology behind it. Haoheng Stone (also known as Eric Stone) is a Chinese-English translator who primary works with human rights-related news articles and government policies. He also runs a blog featuring translations of essays, literature, and political articles from China and Taiwan. I am extremely grateful for these translations as it allows me to read Chinese sources on mythology I would otherwise be unable to access. This article, translated from text by Gan Daofu, discusses the different broad categories of supernatural entities in Chinese mythology. In The Dragon Warrior, Farin fights with guai and yaoguai as well as interacting with shen of various levels. One of the entries also gives insight into the fate of Farin’s grandfather. The book sometimes alternates between Chinese terms and English translations, so to gain a better understanding of the spirit beings of the book, check out the article!

In Traditional Folk Lore and Mythology By: Gan Daofu, Translated By: Eric Stone Source: Article Raw Chinese Text: PasteBin Goblin-monsters Goblin-monster (yaoguai, or yokai in Japanese) is a general term for all supernatural and magical creatures [in Chinese folk lore and mythology] that aren’t gods (shen), immortals (xian), humans, or ghosts (gui), and which have […]

via Chinese Goblins, Monsters, Spirits, Demons, Ghosts, Immortals, and Gods — Haoheng Chinese Translations

Red Thread Reblog: The Dragon Warrior by Katie Zhao – A Love Letter to Diasporic and Immigrant Kids; A Fun Adventure about Dragons, Warriors, and Courage — The Quiet Pond

Welcome to Red Thread Reblog, a feature that pairs a post about media inspired by mythology with a post about the mythology shown in the media.

For the media side, we have a review of The Dragon Warrior from CW of The Quiet Pond! If you haven’t stopped by The Quiet Pond, I highly recommend taking a look. The site features reviews of books by diverse authors, often in the fantasy vein but always looking for empowering #OwnVoices stories. There’s a strong artistic element too. Each member of the team has a magical Pond character avatar who represents them and who become characters in events like the Pondathon reading challenge going on now. Hop over to the Pond to meet Xiaolong, Keeper of Magic, and her friends! I have the Pond to thank for introducing me to The Dragon Warrior, by Katie Zhao. The Lunar New Year, coming up tomorrow, is an important part of this amazing story of…Well, instead of my fan-ramblings, let’s take a look at the review that started it all.

Blurb: As a member of the Jade Society, twelve-year-old Faryn Liu dreams of honoring her family and the gods by becoming a warrior. But the Society has shunned Faryn and her brother Alex ever since their father disappeared years ago, forcing them to train in secret. Then, during an errand into San Francisco, Faryn stumbles […]

via The Dragon Warrior by Katie Zhao – A Love Letter to Diasporic and Immigrant Kids; A Fun Adventure about Dragons, Warriors, and Courage — The Quiet Pond